Microsoft SQL Server 2017

SQL Server is the right choice, but which version?

I ran across a fabulous article this weekend that will help tremendously when determining which version of Microsoft SQL Server is right for your circumstance.

My favorite thought in Brent’s article? “Is it supposed to smell this bad?” Ha!

Let’s look at the rundown of SQL Server 2008, SQL Server 2008 R2, SQL Server 2012, SQL Server 2014, SQL Server 2016, SQL Server 2017, and the upcoming SQL Server 2019.

Which Version of SQL Server Should You Use?

Wait! Before you install that next SQL Server, hold up. Are you sure you’re using the right version?

I know, management wants you to stay on an older build, and the vendor says they’ll only support older versions, but now’s your chance to make your case for a newer version – and I’m gonna help you do it.

I’m going to go from the dark ages forward, making a sales pitch for each newer version.

You should probably install SQL Server 2008 if…
. . . full details here . . .

You should consider SQL Server 2008 R2 if…
. . . full details here . . .

You should consider SQL Server 2012 if…
. . . full details here . . .

You should consider SQL Server 2014 if…
. . . full details here . . .

You should consider SQL Server 2016 if…
. . . full details here . . .

You should consider SQL Server 2017 if…
. . . full details here . . .

So what’s the right answer?
When I look at that list today, SQL Server 2016 makes a pretty compelling case for most folks. It’s a good balance of new features, stability, and long shelf life. In most shops, where folks are overworked and can’t upgrade every server every year, I can see installing 2016 today, and then seeing how 2019’s release goes, and planning for my 2019 deployments in the year 2020.

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I’m listening to Black Water by The Doobie Brothers right now.
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